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NEW QUESTION 1

Which of the following forms of authentication would most likely apply a digital signature algorithm to every bit of data that is sent from the claimant to the verifier?

  • A. Dynamic authentication
  • B. Continuous authentication
  • C. Encrypted authentication
  • D. Robust authentication

Answer: B

Explanation:
Continuous authentication is a type of authentication that provides protection against impostors who can see, alter, and insert information passed between the claimant and verifier even after the claimant/verifier authentication is complete. These are typically referred to as active attacks, since they assume that the imposter can actively influence the connection between claimant and verifier. One way to provide this form of authentication is to apply a digital signature algorithm to every bit of data that is sent from the claimant to the verifier. There are other combinations of cryptography that can provide this form of authentication but current strategies rely on applying some type of cryptography to every bit
of data sent. Otherwise, any unprotected bit would be suspect. Robust authentication relies on dynamic authentication data that changes with each authenticated session between a claimant and a verifier, but does not provide protection against active attacks. Encrypted authentication is a distracter.
Source: GUTTMAN, Barbara & BAGWILL, Robert, NIST Special Publication 800-xx, Internet Security Policy: A Technical Guide, Draft Version, May 25, 2000 (page 34).

NEW QUESTION 2

For maximum security design, what type of fence is most effective and cost-effective method (Foot are being used as measurement unit below)?

  • A. 3' to 4' high
  • B. 6' to 7' high
  • C. 8' high and above with strands of barbed wire
  • D. Double fencing

Answer: D

Explanation:
The most commonly used fence is the chain linked fence and it is the most affordable. The standard is a six-foot high fence with two-inch mesh square openings. The material should consist of nine-gauge vinyl or galvanized metal. Nine-gauge is a typical fence material installed in residential areas.
Additionally, it is recommended to place barbed wire strands angled out from the top of the fence at a 45?? angle and away from the protected area with three strands running across the top. This will provide for a seven-foot fence. There are several variations of the use of ??top guards?? using V-shaped barbed wire or the use of concertina wire as an enhancement, which has been a replacement for more traditional three strand barbed wire ??top guards.??
The fence should be fastened to ridged metal posts set in concrete every six feet with additional bracing at the corners and gate openings. The bottom of the fence should be stabilized against intruders crawling under by attaching posts along the bottom to keep the fence from being pushed or pulled up from the bottom. If the soil is sandy, the bottom edge of the fence should be installed below ground level.
For maximum security design, the use of double fencing with rolls of concertina wire positioned between the two fences is the most effective deterrent and cost-efficient method. In this design, an intruder is required to use an extensive array of ladders and equipment to breach the fences.
Most fencing is largely a psychological deterrent and a boundary marker rather than a barrier, because in most cases such fences can be rather easily penetrated unless added security measures are taken to enhance the security of the fence. Sensors attached to the fence to provide electronic monitoring of cutting or scaling the fence can be used.
Reference(s) used for this question:
Hernandez CISSP, Steven (2012-12-21). Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP CBK, Third Edition ((ISC)2 Press) (Kindle Locations 24416-24431). Auerbach Publications. Kindle Edition.

NEW QUESTION 3

Which of the following is NOT a characteristic or shortcoming of packet filtering gateways?

  • A. The source and destination addresses, protocols, and ports contained in the IP packet header are the only information that is available to the router in making a decision whether or not to permit traffic access to an internal network.
  • B. They don't protect against IP or DNS address spoofing.
  • C. They do not support strong user authentication.
  • D. They are appropriate for medium-risk environment.

Answer: D

Explanation:
Packet filtering firewalls use routers with packet filtering rules to grant or deny access based on source address, destination address, and port.
They offer minimum security but at a very low cost, and can be an appropriate choice for a low-risk environment.
Source: TIPTON, Harold F. & KRAUSE, Micki, Information Security Management Handbook, 4th edition (volume 1), 2000, CRC Press, Chapter 3, Secured Connections to External Networks (page 60).

NEW QUESTION 4

Which backup method is used if backup time is critical and tape space is at an extreme premium?

  • A. Incremental backup method.
  • B. Differential backup method.
  • C. Full backup method.
  • D. Tape backup method.

Answer: A

Explanation:
Full Backup/Archival Backup - Complete/Full backup of every selected file on the system regardless of whether it has been backup recently.. This is the slowest of the backup methods since it backups all the data. It??s however the fastest for restoring data.
Incremental Backup - Any backup in which only the files that have been modified since last full back up are backed up. The archive attribute should be updated while backing up only modified files, which indicates that the file has been backed up. This is the fastest of the backup methods, but the slowest of the restore methods.
Differential Backup - The backup of all data files that have been modified since the last incremental backup or archival/full backup. Uses the archive bit to determine what files have changed since last incremental backup or full backup. The files grows each day until the next full backup is performed clearing the archive attributes. This enables the user to restore all files changed since the last full backup in one pass. This is a more neutral method of backing up data since it??s not faster nor slower than the other two
Easy Way To Remember each of the backup type properties: Backup Speed Restore Speed
Full 3 1
Differential 2 2
Incremental 1 3
Legend: 1 = Fastest 2 = Faster 3 = Slowest Source:
KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, 2001, John Wiley & Sons, Page 69.
and http://www.proprofs.com/mwiki/index.php/Full_Backup,_Incremental_%26_Differential_Bac kup

NEW QUESTION 5

Which of the following is NOT true about IPSec Tunnel mode?

  • A. Fundamentally an IP tunnel with encryption and authentication
  • B. Works at the Transport layer of the OSI model
  • C. Have two sets of IP headers
  • D. Established for gateway service

Answer: B

Explanation:
IPSec can be run in either tunnel mode or transport mode. Each of these modes has its own particular uses and care should be taken to ensure that the correct one is selected for the solution:
Tunnel mode is most commonly used between gateways, or at an end-station to a gateway, the gateway acting as a proxy for the hosts behind it.
Transport mode is used between end-stations or between an end-station and a gateway, if the gateway is being treated as a host??for example, an encrypted Telnet session from a workstation to a router, in which the router is the actual destination.
As Figure 1 shows, basically transport mode should be used for end-to-end sessions and tunnel mode should be used for everything else. (Refer to the figure for the following discussion.)
Figure 1 Tunnel and transport modes in IPSec.
Figure 1 displays some examples of when to use tunnel versus transport mode:
Tunnel mode is most commonly used to encrypt traffic between secure IPSec gateways, such as between the Cisco router and PIX Firewall (as shown in example A in Figure 1). The IPSec gateways proxy IPSec for the devices behind them, such as Alice's PC and the HR servers in Figure 1. In example A, Alice connects to the HR servers securely through the IPSec tunnel set up between the gateways.
Tunnel mode is also used to connect an end-station running IPSec software, such as the Cisco Secure VPN Client, to an IPSec gateway, as shown in example B.
In example C, tunnel mode is used to set up an IPSec tunnel between the Cisco router and a server running IPSec software. Note that Cisco IOS software and the PIX Firewall sets tunnel mode as the default IPSec mode.
Transport mode is used between end-stations supporting IPSec, or between an end-station and a gateway, if the gateway is being treated as a host. In example D, transport mode is used to set up an encrypted Telnet session from Alice's PC running Cisco Secure VPN Client software to terminate at the PIX Firewall, enabling Alice to remotely configure the PIX Firewall securely.
AH Tunnel Versus Transport Mode
Figure 2 shows the differences that the IPSec mode makes to AH. In transport mode, AH services protect the external IP header along with the data payload. AH services protect all the fields in the header that don't change in transport. The header goes after the IP header and before the ESP header, if present, and other higher-layer protocols.
In tunnel mode, the entire original header is authenticated, a new IP header is built, and the new IP header is protected in the same way as the IP header in transport mode.
Figure 2 AH tunnel versus transport mode.
AH is incompatible with Network Address Translation (NAT) because NAT changes the source IP address, which breaks the AH header and causes the packets to be rejected by the IPSec peer.
ESP Tunnel Versus Transport Mode
Figure 3 shows the differences that the IPSec mode makes to ESP. In transport mode, the IP payload is encrypted and the original headers are left intact. The ESP header is inserted after the IP header and before the upper-layer protocol header. The upper-layer protocols are encrypted and authenticated along with the ESP header. ESP doesn't authenticate the IP header itself.
NOTE
Higher-layer information is not available because it's part of the encrypted payload.
When ESP is used in tunnel mode, the original IP header is well protected because the entire original IP datagram is encrypted. With an ESP authentication mechanism, the original IP datagram and the ESP header are included; however, the new IP header is not included in the authentication.
When both authentication and encryption are selected, encryption is performed first, before authentication. One reason for this order of processing is that it facilitates rapid detection and rejection of replayed or bogus packets by the receiving node. Prior to decrypting the packet, the receiver can detect the problem and potentially reduce the impact of denial-of- service attacks.
Figure 3 ESP tunnel versus transport mode.
ESP can also provide packet authentication with an optional field for authentication. Cisco IOS software and the PIX Firewall refer to this service as ESP hashed message authentication code (HMAC). Authentication is calculated after the encryption is done. The current IPSec standard specifies SHA-1 and MD5 as the mandatory HMAC algorithms.
The main difference between the authentication provided by ESP and AH is the extent of the coverage. Specifically, ESP doesn't protect any IP header fields unless those fields are encapsulated by ESP (tunnel mode). Figure 4 illustrates the fields protected by ESP HMAC.
Figure 4 ESP encryption with a keyed HMAC. IPSec Transforms
An IPSec transform specifies a single IPSec security protocol (either AH or ESP) with its corresponding security algorithms and mode. Example transforms include the following:
The AH protocol with the HMAC with MD5 authentication algorithm in tunnel mode is used for authentication.
The ESP protocol with the triple DES (3DES) encryption algorithm in transport mode is used for confidentiality of data.
The ESP protocol with the 56-bit DES encryption algorithm and the HMAC with SHA-1 authentication algorithm in tunnel mode is used for authentication and confidentiality. Transform Sets
A transform set is a combination of individual IPSec transforms designed to enact a specific security policy for traffic. During the ISAKMP IPSec security association negotiation that occurs in IKE phase 2 quick mode, the peers agree to use a particular transform set for protecting a particular data flow. Transform sets combine the following IPSec factors:
Mechanism for payload authentication??AH transform
Mechanism for payload encryption??ESP transform IPSec mode (transport versus tunnel)
Transform sets equal a combination of an AH transform, plus an ESP transform, plus the IPSec mode (either tunnel or transport mode).
This brings us to the end of the second part of this five-part series of articles covering IPSec. Be sure to catch the next installment.
Cisco Press at: http://www.ciscopress.com/articles/printerfriendly.asp?p=25477 and
Source: TIPTON, Harold F. & KRAUSE, MICKI, Information Security Management Handbook, 4th Edition, Volume 2, 2001, CRC Press, NY, Pages 166-167.

NEW QUESTION 6

Which backup method does not reset the archive bit on files that are backed up?

  • A. Full backup method
  • B. Incremental backup method
  • C. Differential backup method
  • D. Additive backup method

Answer: C

Explanation:
The differential backup method only copies files that have changed since the last full backup was performed. It is additive in the fact that it does not reset the archive bit so all changed or added files are backed up in every differential backup until the next full
backup. The "additive backup method" is not a common backup method.
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 3: Telecommunications and Network Security (page 69).

NEW QUESTION 7

Which of the following is a trusted, third party authentication protocol that was developed under Project Athena at MIT?

  • A. Kerberos
  • B. SESAME
  • C. KryptoKnight
  • D. NetSP

Answer: A

Explanation:
Kerberos is a trusted, third party authentication protocol that was developed under Project Athena at MIT.
Kerberos is a network authentication protocol. It is designed to provide strong authentication for client/server applications by using secret-key cryptography. A free implementation of this protocol is available from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Kerberos is available in many commercial products as well.
The Internet is an insecure place. Many of the protocols used in the Internet do not provide any security. Tools to "sniff" passwords off of the network are in common use by systems crackers. Thus, applications which send an unencrypted password over the network are extremely vulnerable. Worse yet, other client/server applications rely on the client program to be "honest" about the identity of the user who is using it. Other applications rely on the client to restrict its activities to those which it is allowed to do, with no other enforcement by the server.
Some sites attempt to use firewalls to solve their network security problems. Unfortunately, firewalls assume that "the bad guys" are on the outside, which is often a very bad
assumption. Most of the really damaging incidents of computer crime are carried out by insiders. Firewalls also have a significant disadvantage in that they restrict how your users can use the Internet. (After all, firewalls are simply a less extreme example of the dictum that there is nothing more secure then a computer which is not connected to the network --- and powered off!) In many places, these restrictions are simply unrealistic and unacceptable.
Kerberos was created by MIT as a solution to these network security problems. The Kerberos protocol uses strong cryptography so that a client can prove its identity to a server (and vice versa) across an insecure network connection. After a client and server have used Kerberos to prove their identity, they can also encrypt all of their communications to assure privacy and data integrity as they go about their business.
Kerberos is freely available from MIT, under a copyright permission notice very similar to the one used for the BSD operating and X11 Windowing system. MIT provides Kerberos in source form, so that anyone who wishes to use it may look over the code for themselves and assure themselves that the code is trustworthy. In addition, for those who prefer to rely on a professional supported product, Kerberos is available as a product from many different vendors.
In summary, Kerberos is a solution to your network security problems. It provides the tools of authentication and strong cryptography over the network to help you secure your information systems across your entire enterprise. We hope you find Kerberos as useful as it has been to us. At MIT, Kerberos has been invaluable to our Information/Technology architecture.
KryptoKnight is a Peer to Peer authentication protocol incorporated into the NetSP product from IBM.
SESAME is an authentication and access control protocol, that also supports communication confidentiality and integrity. It provides public key based authentication along with the Kerberos style authentication, that uses symmetric key cryptography. Sesame supports the Kerberos protocol and adds some security extensions like public key based authentication and an ECMA-style Privilege Attribute Service. The complete Sesame protocol is a two step process. In the first step, the client successfully authenticates itself to the Authentication Server and obtains a ticket that can be presented to the Privilege Attribute Server. In the second step, the initiator obtains proof of his access rights in the form of Privilege Attributes Certificate (PAC). The PAC is a specific form of Access Control Certificate as defined in the ECMA-219 document. This document describes the extensions to Kerberos for public key based authentication as adopted in Sesame.
SESAME, KryptoKnight, and NetSP never took off and the protocols are no longer commonly used.
References:
http://www.cmf.nrl.navy.mil/CCS/people/kenh/kerberos-faq.html#whatis and
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, 2001, John Wiley & Sons, Page 40.

NEW QUESTION 8

How should a doorway of a manned facility with automatic locks be configured?

  • A. It should be configured to be fail-secure.
  • B. It should be configured to be fail-safe.
  • C. It should have a door delay cipher lock.
  • D. It should not allow piggybacking.

Answer: B

Explanation:
Access controls are meant to protect facilities and computers as well as people.
In some situations, the objectives of physical access controls and the protection of people's lives may come into conflict. In theses situations, a person's life always takes precedence.
Many physical security controls make entry into and out of a facility hard, if not impossible. However, special consideration needs to be taken when this could affect lives. In an information processing facility, different types of locks can be used and piggybacking should be prevented, but the issue here with automatic locks is that they can either be configured as fail-safe or fail-secure.
Since there should only be one access door to an information processing facility, the
automatic lock to the only door to a man-operated room must be configured to allow people out in case of emergency, hence to be fail-safe (sometimes called fail-open), meaning that upon fire alarm activation or electric power failure, the locking device unlocks. This is because the solenoid that maintains power to the lock to keep it in a locked state fails and thus opens or unlocks the electronic lock.
Fail Secure works just the other way. The lock device is in a locked or secure state with no power applied. Upon authorized entry, a solinoid unlocks the lock temporarily. Thus in a Fail Secure lock, loss of power of fire alarm activation causes the lock to remain in a secure mode.
Reference(s) used for this question:
Harris, Shon (2012-10-18). CISSP All-in-One Exam Guide, 6th Edition (p. 451). McGraw- Hill. Kindle Edition.
and
Hernandez CISSP, Steven (2012-12-21). Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP CBK, Third Edition ((ISC)2 Press) (Kindle Locations 20249-20251). Auerbach Publications. Kindle Edition.

NEW QUESTION 9

Which of the following computer recovery sites is the least expensive and the most difficult to test?

  • A. non-mobile hot site
  • B. mobile hot site
  • C. warm site
  • D. cold site

Answer: D

Explanation:
Is the least expensive because it is basically a structure with power and would be the most difficult to test because you would have to install all of the hardware infrastructure in order for it to be operational for the test.
The following answers are incorrect:
non-mobile hot site. Is incorrect because it is more expensive then a cold site and easier to test because all of the infrastructure is in place.
mobile hot site. Is incorrect because it is more expensive then a cold site and easier to test because all of the infrastructure is in place.
warm site. Is incorrect because it is more expensive then a cold site and easier to test because more of the infrastructure is in place.

NEW QUESTION 10

Which of the following NAT firewall translation modes offers no protection from hacking attacks to an internal host using this functionality?

  • A. Network redundancy translation
  • B. Load balancing translation
  • C. Dynamic translation
  • D. Static translation

Answer: D

Explanation:
Static translation (also called port forwarding), assigns a fixed address to a specific internal network resource (usually a server).
Static NAT is required to make internal hosts available for connection from external hosts. It merely replaces port information on a one-to-one basis. This affords no protection to
statistically translated hosts: hacking attacks will be just as efficiently translated as any
other valid connection attempt.
NOTE FROM CLEMENT:
Hiding Nat or Overloaded Nat is when you have a group of users behind a unique public IP address. This will provide you with some security through obscurity where an attacker scanning your network would see the unique IP address on the outside of the gateway but could not tell if there is one user, ten users, or hundreds of users behind that IP.
NAT was NEVER built as a security mechanism.
In the case of Static NAT used for some of your servers for example, your web server private IP is map to a valid external public IP on a one on one basis, your SMTP server private IP is mapped to a static public IP, and so on.
If an attacker scan the IP address range on the external side of the gateway he would discover every single one of your servers or any other hosts using static natting. Ports that are open, services that are listening, and all of this info could be gathered just as if the server was in fact using a public IP. It does not provide this security through obscurity mentioned above.
All of the other answer are incorrect. Reference used for this question:
STREBE, Matthew and PERKINS, Charles, Firewalls 24seven, Sybex 2000, Chapter 7:
Network Address Translation.

NEW QUESTION 11

In what way can violation clipping levels assist in violation tracking and analysis?

  • A. Clipping levels set a baseline for acceptable normal user errors, and violations exceeding that threshold will be recorded for analysis of why the violations occurred.
  • B. Clipping levels enable a security administrator to customize the audit trail to record only those violations which are deemed to be security relevant.
  • C. Clipping levels enable the security administrator to customize the audit trail to record only actions for users with access to user accounts with a privileged status.
  • D. Clipping levels enable a security administrator to view all reductions in security levels which have been made to user accounts which have incurred violations.

Answer: A

Explanation:
Companies can set predefined thresholds for the number of certain types of errors that will be allowed before the activity is considered suspicious. The threshold is a baseline for violation activities that may be normal for a user to commit before alarms are raised. This baseline is referred to as a clipping level.
The following are incorrect answers:
Clipping levels enable a security administrator to customize the audit trail to record only those violations which are deemed to be security relevant. This is not the best answer, you would not record ONLY security relevant violations, all violations would be recorded as well as all actions performed by authorized users which may not trigger a violation. This could
allow you to indentify abnormal activities or fraud after the fact.
Clipping levels enable the security administrator to customize the audit trail to record only actions for users with access to user accounts with a privileged status. It could record all security violations whether the user is a normal user or a privileged user.
Clipping levels enable a security administrator to view all reductions in security levels which have been made to user accounts which have incurred violations. The keyword "ALL" makes this question wrong. It may detect SOME but not all of violations. For example, application level attacks may not be detected.
Reference(s) used for this question:
Harris, Shon (2012-10-18). CISSP All-in-One Exam Guide, 6th Edition (p. 1239). McGraw- Hill. Kindle Edition.
and
TIPTON, Hal, (ISC)2, Introduction to the CISSP Exam presentation.

NEW QUESTION 12

A momentary power outage is a:

  • A. spike
  • B. blackout
  • C. surge
  • D. fault

Answer: D

Explanation:
A momentary power outage is a fault.
Power Excess
Spike --> Too much voltage for a short period of time. Surge --> Too much voltage for a long period of time.
Power Loss
Fault --> A momentary power outage. Blackout --> A long power interruption.
Power Degradation
Sag or Dip --> A momentary low voltage.
Brownout --> A prolonged power supply that is below normal voltage. Reference(s) used for this question:
HARRIS, Shon, All-In-One CISSP Certification Exam Guide, 3rd. Edition McGraw- Hill/Osborne, 2005, page 368.
and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_quality

NEW QUESTION 13

When backing up an applications system's data, which of the following is a key question to be answered first?

  • A. When to make backups
  • B. Where to keep backups
  • C. What records to backup
  • D. How to store backups

Answer: C

Explanation:
It is critical that a determination be made of WHAT data is important and should be retained and protected. Without determining the data to be backed up, the potential for error increases. A record or file could be vital and yet not included in a backup routine. Alternatively, temporary or insignificant files could be included in a backup routine unnecessarily.
The following answers were incorrect:
When to make backups Although it is important to consider schedules for backups, this is done after the decisions are made of what should be included in the backup routine.
Where to keep backups The location of storing backup copies of data (Such as tapes, on- line backups, etc) should be made after determining what should be included in the backup routine and the method to store the backup.
How to store backups The backup methodology should be considered after determining what data should be included in the backup routine.

NEW QUESTION 14

Which of the following is the most secure form of triple-DES encryption?

  • A. DES-EDE3
  • B. DES-EDE1
  • C. DES-EEE4
  • D. DES-EDE2

Answer: A

Explanation:
Triple DES with three distinct keys is the most secure form of triple-DES encryption. It can either be DES-EEE3 (encrypt-encrypt-encrypt) or DES-EDE3 (encrypt- decrypt-encrypt). DES-EDE1 is not defined and would mean using a single key to encrypt, decrypt and encrypt again, equivalent to single DES. DES-EEE4 is not defined and DES- EDE2 uses only 2 keys (encrypt with first key, decrypt with second key, encrypt with first key again).
Source: DUPUIS, Cl?ment, CISSP Open Study Guide on domain 5, cryptography, April 1999.

NEW QUESTION 15

Which of the following does NOT use token-passing?

  • A. ARCnet
  • B. FDDI
  • C. Token-ring
  • D. IEEE 802.3

Answer: D

Explanation:
IEEE 802.3 specifies the standard for Ethernet and uses CSMA/CD, not token-passing.
Source: KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, John Wiley & Sons, 2001, Chapter 3: Telecommunications and Network Security (page 104).

NEW QUESTION 16

Which of the following is often the greatest challenge of distributed computing solutions?

  • A. scalability
  • B. security
  • C. heterogeneity
  • D. usability

Answer: B

Explanation:
The correct answer to this "security". It is a major factor in deciding if a centralized or decentralized environment is more appropriate.
Example: In a centralized computing environment, you have a central server and workstations (often "dumb terminals") access applications, data, and everything else from that central servers. Therefore, the vast majority of your security resides on a centrally managed server. In a decentralized (or distributed) environment, you have a collection of PC's each with their own operating systems to maintain, their own software to maintain, local data storage requiring protection and backup. You may also have PDA's and "smart phones", data watches, USB devices of all types able to store data... the list gets longer all the time.
It is entirely possible to reach a reasonable and acceptable level of security in a distributed environment. But doing so is significantly more difficult, requiring more effort, more money, and more time.
The other answers are not correct because:
scalability - A distributed computing environment is almost infinitely scalable. Much more so than a centralized environment. This is therefore a bad answer.
heterogeneity - Having products and systems from multiple vendors in a distributed environment is significantly easier than in a centralized environment. This would not be a "challenge of distributed computing solutions" and so is not a good answer.
usability - This is potentially a challenge in either environment, but whether or not this is a problem has very little to do with whether it is a centralized or distributed environment. Therefore, this would not be a good answer.
Reference:
Official ISC2 Guide page: 313-314
All in One Third Edition page: (unavailable at this time)

NEW QUESTION 17

Which of the following terms can be described as the process to conceal data into another file or media in a practice known as security through obscurity?

  • A. Steganography
  • B. ADS - Alternate Data Streams
  • C. Encryption
  • D. NTFS ADS

Answer: A

Explanation:
It is the art and science of encoding hidden messages in such a way that no one, apart from the sender and intended recipient, suspects the existence of the message or could claim there is a message.
It is a form of security through obscurity.
The word steganography is of Greek origin and means "concealed writing." It combines the Greek words steganos (), meaning "covered or protected," and graphei () meaning "writing."
The first recorded use of the term was in 1499 by Johannes Trithemius in his Steganographia, a treatise on cryptography and steganography, disguised as a book on magic. Generally, the hidden messages will appear to be (or be part of) something else: images, articles, shopping lists, or some other cover text. For example, the hidden message may be in invisible ink between the visible lines of a private letter.
The advantage of steganography over cryptography alone is that the intended secret
message does not attract attention to itself as an object of scrutiny. Plainly visible encrypted messages, no matter how unbreakable, will arouse interest, and may in themselves be incriminating in countries where encryption is illegal. Thus, whereas cryptography is the practice of protecting the contents of a message alone, steganography is concerned with concealing the fact that a secret message is being sent, as well as concealing the contents of the message.
It is sometimes referred to as Hiding in Plain Sight. This image of trees blow contains in it another image of a cat using Steganography.
ADS Tree with Cat inside
SSCP dumps exhibit
C:\Users\MCS\Desktop\1.jpg
This image below is hidden in the picture of the trees above:
SSCP dumps exhibit
C:\Users\MCS\Desktop\1.jpg Hidden Kitty
As explained here the image is hidden by removing all but the two least significant bits of each color component and subsequent normalization.
ABOUT MSF and LSF
One of the common method to perform steganography is by hiding bits within the Least Significant Bits of a media (LSB) or what is sometimes referred to as Slack Space. By modifying only the least significant bit, it is not possible to tell if there is an hidden message or not looking at the picture or the media. If you would change the Most Significant Bits (MSB) then it would be possible to view or detect the changes just by looking at the picture. A person can perceive only up to 6 bits of depth, bit that are changed past the first sixth bit of the color code would be undetectable to a human eye.
If we make use of a high quality digital picture, we could hide six bits of data within each of the pixel of the image. You have a color code for each pixel composed of a Red, Green, and Blue value. The color code is 3 sets of 8 bits each for each of the color. You could change the last two bit to hide your data. See below a color code for one pixel in binary format. The bits below are not real they are just example for illustration purpose:
RED GREEN BLUE
0101 0101 1100 1011 1110 0011
MSB LSB MSB LSB MSB LSB
Let's say that I would like to hide the letter A uppercase within the pixels of the picture. If we convert the letter "A" uppercase to a decimal value it would be number 65 within the ASCII table , in binary format the value 65 would translet to 01000001
You can break the 8 bits of character A uppercase in group of two bits as follow: 01 00 00 01
Using the pixel above we will hide those bits within the last two bits of each of the color as follow:
RED GREEN BLUE
0101 0101 1100 1000 1110 0000
MSB LSB MSB LSB MSB LSB
As you can see above, the last two bits of RED was already set to the proper value of 01, then we move to the GREEN value and we changed the last two bit from 11 to 00, and finally we changed the last two bits of blue to 00. One pixel allowed us to hide 6 bits of
data. We would have to use another pixel to hide the remaining two bits. The following answers are incorrect:
- ADS - Alternate Data Streams: This is almost correct but ADS is different from steganography in that ADS hides data in streams of communications or files while Steganography hides data in a single file.
- Encryption: This is almost correct but Steganography isn't exactly encryption as much as using space in a file to store another file.
- NTFS ADS: This is also almost correct in that you're hiding data where you have space to do so. NTFS, or New Technology File System common on Windows computers has a feature where you can hide files where they're not viewable under normal conditions. Tools are required to uncover the ADS-hidden files.
The following reference(s) was used to create this question: The CCCure Security+ Holistic Tutorial at http://www.cccure.tv and
Steganography tool and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steganography

NEW QUESTION 18

A DMZ is also known as a

  • A. screened subnet
  • B. three legged firewall
  • C. a place to attract hackers
  • D. bastion host

Answer: A

Explanation:
This is another name for the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of a network.
"Three legged firewall" is incorrect. While a DMZ can be implemented on one leg of such a device, this is not the best answer.
"A place to attract hackers" is incorrect. The DMZ is a way to provide limited public access to an organization's internal resources (DNS, EMAIL, public web, etc) not as an attractant for hackers.
"Bastion host" is incorrect. A bastion host serves as a gateway between trusted and untrusted network.
References: CBK, p. 434
AIO3, pp. 495 - 496

NEW QUESTION 19

Which of the following statements regarding an off-site information processing facility is TRUE?

  • A. It should have the same amount of physical access restrictions as the primary processing site.
  • B. It should be located in proximity to the originating site so that it can quickly be made operational.
  • C. It should be easily identified from the outside so in the event of an emergency it can beeasily found.
  • D. Need not have the same level of environmental monitoring as the originating site since this would be cost prohibitive.

Answer: A

Explanation:
It is very important that the offsite has the same restrictions in order to avoide misuse.
The following answers are incorrect because:
It should be located in proximity to the originating site so that it can quickly be made operational is incorrect as the offsite is also subject to the same disaster as of the primary site.
It should be easily identified from the outside so in the event of an emergency it can be easily found is also incorrect as it should not be easily identified to prevent intentional sabotage.
Need not have the same level of environmental monitoring as the originating site since this would be cost prohibitive is also incorrect as it should be like its primary site.
Reference : Information Systems Audit and Control Association, Certified Information Systems Auditor 2002 review manual, chapter 5: Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity (page 265).

NEW QUESTION 20

Which of the following is NOT a transaction redundancy implementation?

  • A. on-site mirroring
  • B. Electronic Vaulting
  • C. Remote Journaling
  • D. Database Shadowing

Answer: A

Explanation:
Three concepts are used to create a level of fault tolerance and redundancy in transaction processing.
They are Electronic vaulting, remote journaling and database shadowing provide redundancy at the transaction level.
Electronic vaulting is accomplished by backing up system data over a network. The backup location is usually at a separate geographical location known as the vault site. Vaulting can be used as a mirror or a backup mechanism using the standard incremental or differential backup cycle. Changes to the host system are sent to the vault server in real-time when the backup method is implemented as a mirror. If vaulting updates are recorded in real-time, then it will be necessary to perform regular backups at the off-site location to provide recovery services due to inadvertent or malicious alterations to user or system data.
Journaling or Remote Journaling is another technique used by database management systems to provide redundancy for their transactions. When a transaction is completed, the database management system duplicates the journal entry at a remote location. The journal provides sufficient detail for the transaction to be replayed on the remote system. This provides for database recovery in the event that the database becomes corrupted or unavailable.
There are also additional redundancy options available within application and database software platforms. For example, database shadowing may be used where a database management system updates records in multiple locations. This technique updates an entire copy of the database at a remote location.
Reference used for this question:
Hernandez CISSP, Steven (2012-12-21). Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP CBK, Third Edition ((ISC)2 Press) (Kindle Locations 20403-20407). Auerbach Publications. Kindle Edition.
and
Hernandez CISSP, Steven (2012-12-21). Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CISSP CBK, Third Edition ((ISC)2 Press) (Kindle Locations 20375-20377). Auerbach Publications. Kindle Edition.

NEW QUESTION 21

In non-discretionary access control using Role Based Access Control (RBAC), a central authority determines what subjects can have access to certain objects based on the organizational security policy. The access controls may be based on:

  • A. The societies role in the organization
  • B. The individual's role in the organization
  • C. The group-dynamics as they relate to the individual's role in the organization
  • D. The group-dynamics as they relate to the master-slave role in the organization

Answer: B

Explanation:
In Non-Discretionary Access Control, when Role Based Access Control is being used, a central authority determines what subjects can have access to certain objects based on the organizational security policy. The access controls may be based on the individual's role in the organization.
Reference(S) used for this question:
KRUTZ, Ronald L. & VINES, Russel D., The CISSP Prep Guide: Mastering the Ten Domains of Computer Security, 2001, John Wiley & Sons, Page 33.

NEW QUESTION 22
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